Endoscopic Laminotomy

For patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) who have not responded to conservative treatment, there is another option before you pursue an invasive spine surgery. An endoscopic laminotomy is a minimally invasive spinal procedure that could effectively treat your symptoms, whether they are from LSS or some other spinal condition, and provide you with much-needed relief.

Almost everyone will experience some kind of spinal degeneration as they age. Lumbar spinal stenosis occurs when the spinal canal becomes narrowed. This could happen because of age or some other spine-related issue like bone spurs or herniated discs. When the spinal canal narrows, it puts pressure on the spinal nerves causing a host of adverse side effects such as back pain, leg pain, numbness or tingling, as well as other symptoms.

A traditional laminotomy is a decompressive surgical procedure that relieves pressure on the nerves and gives them more space in the spinal column by removing part of the lamina, the bony arch of the vertebra that protect the spinal cord, as well as bone spurs, herniated disc material or fatty ligaments. However, an endoscopic laminotomy is one of the least invasive surgeries for effective treatment of LSS and may provide patients with the same benefits.

What Is an Endoscopic Laminotomy?

The team at Spine Institute of North America seeks to provide conservative treatment options for lumbar spinal stenosis first and foremost. However, if these fail to treat your symptoms, your doctor may recommend an endoscopic laminotomy.

When you undergo an endoscopic laminotomy, you’ll be able to leave the surgical center the same day the procedure is performed. After being sedated, your skin is numbed, and a small incision no bigger than two centimeters is made in the target area. Generally, an X-ray taken ahead of time will allow your doctor to verify where this incision needs to be made.

During the procedure, the surgeon creates an opening of the lamina above and below the spinal disc to relieve nerve compression. If some of your pain is caused by a herniated disc, then the surgeon can also address this concern at the same time.

What Conditions Does an Endoscopic Laminotomy Treat?

An endoscopic laminotomy can help treat the following conditions:

What Is the Success Rate for an Endoscopic Laminotomy?

At Spine Institute of North America, our patients have achieved overwhelming success in the relief of adverse symptoms associated with lumbar spinal stenosis through this procedure. Our results are confirmed by research showing that almost all patients who undergo an endoscopic laminotomy report a significantly lower level of disability and pain severity after the procedure is complete.

Who Is a Candidate for This Procedure?

Endoscopic laminotomies are the perfect solution for those who have exhausted conservative options in the treatment of their LSS and other related conditions. It is minimally invasive, especially when compared to a traditional laminotomy. However, your physician at Spine Institute of North America will examine your specific circumstances before determining if this treatment is right for you.

What Are the Advantages of an Endoscopic Laminotomy?

Some of the advantages you can expect from pursuing an endoscopic laminotomy to treat your condition include:

  • Minimally invasive procedure and a shorter recovery time
  • Extremely high success rates
  • Almost no blood loss, or very minimal loss
  • Requires only local anesthesia
  • Preservation of spinal mobility
  • Requires only a small incision
  • Minimal scar formation
  • Requires no hospitalization — surgery is an outpatient procedure with patients going home the same day

What Is Recovery Like After an Endoscopic Laminotomy?

An endoscopic laminotomy generally takes just over an hour to complete. Unlike invasive open spine surgery, it’s an outpatient procedure that does not require patients to stay in the hospital. In fact, patients can go home the same day the procedure is performed. Because there is less blood loss, and the surrounding tissue receives less disruption, patients experience far less postoperative pain. This means they don’t require as much pain medication.

Your doctor may recommend postoperative exercises. Also, they will discuss with you as to when you can go back to work and resume your normal level of activity.

Find out More at Spine Institute of North America

If lumbar spinal stenosis is negatively impacting your life or if you are experiencing adverse symptoms related to your back pain, then it’s time to make an appointment at Spine Institute of North America. Our team of doctors will work with you to find an appropriate treatment that will help you live a fuller and more active life. Contact us today to find out more.